Indiana Cattle

at INcattle.com

IBEEF - Indiana Beef Evaluation and Economics Feeding Program IBEEF is a steer and heifer feedout program that provides Indiana producers with a way to place cattle on feed and gather performance, carcass, and economic information to make genetic and management improvements in their herd. Cooperators receive individual and group feedlot performance, feedlot costs, and individual and group carcass information, including quality and yield grade, ribeye area, fat thickness, carcass weight, etc. IBEEF also allows producers to compare sires, as well as evaluate alternative marketing strategies and their impact upon profitability. The program also helps to improve the reputation of producer cattle by establishing a database of feedlot performance and carcass merit on their calves. Visit Site for More


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CattleToday.com
CattleToday's Q & A Boards are a Cattle Forum for swapping information and asking and answering questions about breed, health problems, beginners questions and jokes about cattle and horses.

High School football
by ez14 (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 22:46:05 GMT+5)
Lowell beat Cedar springs 27-8 on the radio they had the score backwards i know going a whole season undefeated is unlikely but to lose to Cedar springs would have been embarrassing



Honest input cost variables
by City Guy (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 22:38:57 GMT+5)
From dozens of real world cattlemen around the world. I guess hobby farming is different. Can't see working that hard for a hobby.
Will you explain to me what it is I got wrong, please?



Lowline vs Square Meater
by Backbone Ranch (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 22:34:07 GMT+5)
It is true that Square Meaters are smaller framed Murray Greys. Our herd of Murray Greys average between a frame 4 and 4.5. We grass-finish our steers and process them at two years of age. Below are ribeye steaks from two different steers that we have processed. Murray Greys possess great carcass traits which allow them to marble well and produce extremely tender beef on grass alone.





What are you eating today?
by ez14 (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 22:33:18 GMT+5)
skyhightree1 wrote:
thats what its like around here when moms gone im no cook



Ready for Football and some Fall Weather
by greybeard (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 22:29:37 GMT+5)
Shaking out good..for Washington. Kinda makes ya wonder how The Cardinal was rated that high.



Winter protein
by kenny thomas (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 22:12:40 GMT+5)
Corn is cheap this year and has lots of energy. Do you really know the quality of your hay. Have it tested to see what is needed.



expectations of a calving ease bull/report
by talltimber (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 21:55:55 GMT+5)
Yes sir, I'm here. I took my yearling steers to a buyer in Nashville today, just getting back.

I will try to answer all questions, and be as honest as my memory serves. No weights, I weighed a full term dead one, and with our jacked up weighing apparatus weighed 69 pounds. A feed scale on one end, and a fish scale on the other, added them together. But if this calf weighed 69 lbs, my calves out of my bull I doubt weigh 55 pounds, some of them. I think mine weigh more than that. I think the calf was 80 or more. I just don't know for sure. Would've been good to know, but I had a full plate and was trying to get some of them on the ground alive.
Here is the breakdown.
Heifer no.
1. 48 days early, dead, leg back, head back, incomplete fetotomy (sp), put heifer down. Blamed on the heat.
2. 45 days early, dead, about 30 pounds or so maybe, no assist, not present at the time. Blamed on the heat.
3. 9 days early, dead, hand pulled, not dilated fully, water bag out, one or two contractions seen, then quit, she was laying down with water back out when we got there, didn't know how long. Calf's head was turned a little but on top of legs, both legs positioned correctly. An old vet I talked to about her in particular, said he thought her problems started before I got there. Probably was hurting her to push so she quit. So, don't really know what happened here. Was hot still, but also wasn't there to witness, we were at work. My wife checked on them at noon that day and I arrived around 5pm or so.
4. 5 days early, no assist, not present.
5. 4 days early, hand pull.
6. 4 days early, no assist.
7. 15 days early, hand pull.
8. 4 days late, hand pull.
9. 1 day early, a tough hand pull for Dad and I.

As a general rule, as I have been advised and read (first heifers for me) to allow a half hour for a cow and an hour for heifers before helping/checking. Problem is/was, is that there is not a hard start time. That is what I struggled with. With the trouble with the first three I felt some pressure to be there as often as possible, and do what I could to help. It's possible that I am helping a little too soon, as Dad had suggested that I may be doing. Idk. I have also read/witnessed what I think were swelled heads and tongues and dumb calves through hard births/extended times in the birth canal. This is what I was thinking when I was witnessing the following, as a general rule:
Heifer getting off to herself, nervous, searching.
If in the lot, scratching rear/rubbing down fence while walking it.
As she begins humping up occasionally, water bag appears. This continues for a time, and water bag breaks, it varies from less than an hour to two hours or little more before I do something, once her contractions appear more often. Especially once she gets down from a time or two, to seven or eight times, obviously pushing, maybe a foot or two showing, sometimes nothing, I get motivated.



smashed finger
by Kingfisher (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 21:06:50 GMT+5)
Dang that hurt reading it....



Weaning, couldn;t figure a better place to put it
by talltimber (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 21:05:40 GMT+5)
Congrats, sounds like they are taking good care of you!



Polaris Ranger Diesel
by TCRanch (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 20:39:49 GMT+5)
dun wrote:You going to put a Ford oval on it?

Ha!!!



lime talk
by machslammer (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 20:14:28 GMT+5)
Our lime price is $3.50 a ton dumped in field. We rent a spreader for 100 a day and i can spread about 50 ton in a day.



New Haygrazer Molding?
by machslammer (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 19:57:44 GMT+5)
Feed em they'll lick the ground where you feed it. . We grow and had 50 rolls of it that was little wet when rolled and it completely molded. .we threw it in a ditch for soil control and put the cows out perfect fescue hay and they ate every roll of that molded stuff before eating any of the fescue hay. .they love the sugar stalks



Does Rock music no longer exist?
by Clodhopper (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 19:44:33 GMT+5)
bigbull338 wrote:the old rock that we know has gone the same way as the old country we used to listen to.theres no more geo jones waylon merle or johnny just like theres no more zztop led zeplin or queen.
The good music is out there, you just won't hear it on the radio. You got to hunt it down for yourself.



wifes got stomach cancer
by dieselbeef (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 19:28:26 GMT+5)
that's a shame bb...it so hard man I dont even know..i always told her she would be taking car of my old broken downA$$...she sure showed me!



The heat is on again
by chevytaHOE5674 (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 19:23:25 GMT+5)
Had a few high 30 degree nights and a couple of daytime highs in the upper 40's with lots of rain the last few days. But its warming back into the 60's now.



cattletoday.xml

INFORMATION IS KING WHEN MARKETING CALVES
Calving season discussion is often a heated debate among beef producers. Should I calve in the spring or the fall? Do I need to pull my bull? Is it better to be committed to selling calves at a certain time of year or should I have calves available year round? These are common questions beef producers often ask themselves, their neighbors, and the experts when trying to make management decisions. There are two key points that need to be considered when making calving season (or lack thereof decisions: management and marketing.
BLACK INK -- RETROSPECTIVE
A lot can change in 10 years. A quick glance at my family Christmas card provides proof. From a picture of an old Kansas farmhouse to today's Nebraska-based scene, where nearly half a dozen smiling faces fill the frame, transformation is obvious.
TAKE STEPS TO REDUCE SHRINK WHEN WORKING CATTLE
One of the largest overlooked costs for stockmen when selling cattle is shrink. For example, if you are taking calves to a feeder calf sale, to be weighed off the truck and a two percent pencil shrink taken, those calves may have already lost six percent or more of their weight just getting them to market, resulting in at least eight percent shrink deducted from your paycheck.
BE PREPARED TO ENSURE A SUCCESSFUL CALVING SEASON
The fall calving season has kicked off, but are you really prepared for it? Here are a few of the important things to have handy for a successful calving season.
RESEARCHERS STUDY GENES TO ASSIST IN CATTLE BREEDING
Beef cattle selection may soon be as easy as looking at a cow's genes.
FOCUS ON GOOD MANAGEMENT OF A.I. PROGRAMS
The use of artificial insemination in beef cow operations has never reached anywhere near the acceptance of that of the dairy industry. The reasons for this bear discussion as they typically relate to many of the problems we encounter with A.I. in beef herds.
COMPOSITE BULLS HAVE BECOME POPULAR IN SOME AREAS
Heterosis (hybrid vigor) has proven its value in many agricultural sectors—whether production of hybrid corn, hogs or beef. There are three kinds of heterosis; individual (the calf), maternal, and paternal. Of the three, paternal heterosis has had the least attention.
HUNTIN' DAYLIGHT - SHRINKING HAY LOSSES
Expanding beef production and looming increased calf numbers continue to pressure cattle prices lower, further and faster than many expected.
LOOK AT ALTERNATIVES THAT CAN REDUCE ANTIBIOTIC DEPENDENCE
The handwriting on the wall has become pretty clear. Justified or not, the use of antibiotics in managing the beef animal, at any stage of production, is becoming more challenging.
IT'S THE PITTS -- YOU NEVER KNOW
The bull business is very competitive and purebred people play to win. Because there's a limited number of buyers, breeders spend a fortune on color ads and hire their own field men to exhort ranchers to come to their sale. I knew one breeder who passed out a hundred dollar bill for every bull a ranch manager bought, and once I even saw a bull breeder buy the county fair show steer that belonged to the granddaughter of a large rancher hoping it would pay off.
MAKE A GOOD INVESTMENT WHEN BUYING BULLS
Are you sifting through stacks of bull sale catalogs looking for your next bull? While bull selection can be a daunting task, your choice will impact your herd for years to come. Thus, taking some time to think about what you need from your next herd sire is important.
ADVANCEMENTS IN EPDS IMPROVE ACCURACY
It was about 40 years ago that the beef industry was introduced to the Expected Progeny Difference (EPD). In the early days, data were limited and based on comparisons with a few reference sires used in designed programs. There has been much progress in the methods used to calculate EPDs, and today most breed associations provide EPDs on all animals in the breed. After 40 years, there is still confusion over how to use these tools.
ANNUAL FOOD PLOTS PROVIDE NUTRITIONAL BENEFITS
When planting wildlife food plots, which is better: annuals or perennials? Ideally, you should have different plots designated for both cool- and warm-season annuals, as well as perennials.
PLAN VACCINATION PROGRAM BEFORE BREEDING SEASON
Some diseases affect reproduction, in bulls as well as in cows. It's best to try to prevent these diseases by making sure the cows and bulls have adequate immunity before breeding season.
18TH HERDBUILDER REPLACEMENT FEMALE SALE AVERAGES $2,086
The 18th Annual Herdbuilder Replacement Female Sale was held August 26th at Alabama Livestock Auction in Uniontown, Ala.

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